I’m Still Here!!!!!

Since discovering FaceBook I have put most of my work and updates there.  Here is a link to visit that area but I think I’ll just keep this page updated as well.  Below is a bunch of photos from recent builds, feel free to ask about them!!!

Mr Rogers was a B-24 pilot who was at Pearl Harbor when it was attacked, went to Europe flying B-24s, got shot down, became a POW and finally escaped to freedom.  What a story!

Mr Rogers was a B-24 pilot who was at Pearl Harbor when it was attacked, went to Europe flying B-24s, got shot down, became a POW and finally escaped to freedom. What a story!

Frank was an electricians mate second class on the USS Hammehead.  His primary duty was operating the electrical propulsion system while the boat was submerged.  He completed 7 patrols.  The sub model took 3 months to build and measures over 4 1/2 feet long!

Frank was an electricians mate second class on the USS Hammehead. His primary duty was operating the electrical propulsion system while the boat was submerged. He completed 7 patrols. The sub model took 3 months to build and measures over 4 1/2 feet long!

This is the Razorback version of the fighter. It was built as part of a display I was using to try to garner donations to keep the project going.

This is the Razorback version of the fighter. It was built as part of a display I was using to try to garner donations to keep the project going.

This was also built as part of the display.

This was also built as part of the display.

Bill Maul was skipper of a PT Boat in the Pacific.  In fact, he was JFK's commanding officer!!!  The model took over 300 hours to build and paint and is, in my opinion, one of my best builds!

Bill Maul was skipper of a PT Boat in the Pacific. In fact, he was JFK’s commanding officer!!! The model took over 300 hours to build and paint and is, in my opinion, one of my best builds!

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Update on the Project

It’s been awhile since my last post so here’s an update.  I’ve completed 3 more models since the B-17 and really have no excuse or reason as to why I haven’t posted anything regarding them.  Here are some pictures for you to see, then we’ll talk.

100_6962100_6963100_6965This is a 1:72 scale B-29 used in the Pacific Theater of Operations to bomb the Japanese home islands.  The model was asked for and built for a Navy Veteran who was stationed in Washington as the Navy archivist.  Why he wanted a B-29 I don’t know, but what the Veteran wants, the Veteran gets!

 

100_7045100_7057To add more items to the display, I built this 1:32 scale P-51 painted in the colors of the 377th Fighter Squadron.

 

100_7074 100_7075100_7076100_7070100_7069These pictures show a small portion of the display.  You’ll notice a Sherman tank on the table, I forgot to take pictures of that before I took it to the display.

100_7087100_7088100_7093100_7089This PBY was requested by a naval aircraft engineer.  He had nothing to do with the PBY, but this is the aircraft he asked for due to them being stationed at the same Florida navy base he was at.

100_7080100_7081100_7084100_7086This M-3 Stewart is another add on to the display to give the “tankers” their fair share of the well deserved glory.

The next build on the schedule will be the biggest model I’ve ever built.  It’s a 1:35 scale PT Boat very much like the one President Kennedy skippered.  Had I known how big the model was I would have opted for another scale.  There is a formula to determine the length of the model.  The real subject is 80 feet long so you multiply 80 feet by 12 (inches to a foot) and come up with 960.  Then divide that by the scale, in this case 35 and come up with a length of over 27 inches of model!   Yep, it’s a big one.  Because of the size and the incredible amount of detail to this kit, I will be posting a thread dedicated to the build.

 

B-17 Flying Fortress Complete!!!!

Easily the most ambitious project I’ve ever done, it was worth the time just to see the recipients face!

Here she is all dressed up and no place to go.  This is prior to gun turret installation, landing gear and decals.

Props and wheels painted and clear coated.

Top turret and chin turret.

The masking needed to maintain the see thrue portion of the model.  This alone took several days to complete.

And here she is, all done!  I’ll post a series of pictures following.  I’m very proud of this one!

Thank You for following!!!  Up next is a 1:72 scale B-29 then I’m taking a break from building so I can get myself in shape, gained a few pounds since this project.

B-17G Flying Fortress (pt 3)

I’ve had several days off from work and with less then great weather, was able to make good progress in the build.  Basically the interior is completed, has been dry fitted and awaits joining the two fuselage halves together.

This is the bombardier, navigator, cockpit and bomb bay area.

This is the bomb bay, radio operator and waist gun position.

This is the waist gun position after completion.  The wooden box to the left of the gun is where the .50 cal ammo was stored.  A flexible chute ran from the box to the gun that channeled the rounds into the gun chamber.  This gun is shown in the stowed position. The yellow object is the oxygen tank for the yet to be installed ball turret that hangs from the trunnion.

 

This provides a better view of the ball turret trunnion.

B-17G Flying Fortress (cont)

This build is really…well…difficult.  I may have bitten off more then I’m used to chewing with all the photo etched details and painting highlights.  Let’s just show some pictures with captions, that’ll be easier.

 

As I view these photos, I realize much of this may net be seen.  For instance, the bombardiers control panel as seen in photos # 1 & 5 is on the port side of the aircraft facing starboard.  The clear, see thrue portion will also be on the port side thus making the control panel visible only thrue the nose.  Beside the base green color, everything has been painted by hand and actually looks better to the naked eye then here.  There is a huge amount of photo etch not used and that’s because much of it will not be seen from any angle and the other reason being I’m on somewhat of a time constraint and need to move along.

And speaking of moving along, here’s the just completed radio room:

Are any of you wondering what this photo etched stuff is I keep talking about?  You see those black radio boxes and yellow air corps seat?  That’s photo etch.  It began life as  a flat piece of metal the thickness of 2 sheets on paper.  After cutting the part from the sprue, you need to fold it into the shape it’s meant to represent.

B-17G Flying Fortress

Well, this is what I hope will be the center piece to the Project.  It’s being built for 2 of the men in the group.  One was a flight engineer/ top turret gunner I’ll refer to as Mr B and the other was a co-pilot who will be named Mr C.  The model will carry the markings for the 381st Bomb Group of which Mr B was assigned being of the two men, Mr B has most of his faculties intact where as Mr C is sadly too far gone to realize much of anything.  The model will have sections on the port side of the fuselage that will be clear, enabling a view of the inside of the aircraft.  Extensive photo etch will be added to enhance the detail.  It will be by far my most ambitious build yet.

This is one of the Wright Cyclone engines before being enhanced with metalized silver paint.

And this is the engine after the enhancement

The wings gave me as much grief as I expected but I found with some patients and looking at the problem from a different angel, I made it work.

The top photo shows the “canyon” between the upper and lower engine nacelles.  Lots of cement and clamps and a rest over night took care of most of the problem, but further work was still required.

Here are all 4 engines and above them, their cowlings they will be fitted into.  The cowlings will be painted interior green chromate which was used as an anti corrosive agent on most aircraft interior areas.

And here they are as they will appear before any painting is done.

And as they will appear on the wing.  The portion of the engine nacelle facing the aircraft (in this case the area on the left) will be painted with an olive drab anti glare panel.  All aircraft that were left bare metal reflected the sun, so the anti glare panels were added to reduce and eliminate the reflection.  The light areas between the engines cylinders is the rear fire wall that will also be painted interior green chromate.

Literally hours were spent filling and sanding the upper and lower wing joint.  These may be the best wings I’ve ever done.  The different shades of grey is caused by paint brushed onto the seam to make and flaws stand out.  There are none.